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  Home > Ethics > Curriculum > Data Management
Teaching Ethics for Research, Scholarship, & Practice

Research Data Management

November 14, 2003

Learning Objectives

University Policies and Procedures

Curriculum Overview

Information Resources

 

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Be familiar with the issues relevant to research data and information and know how to access the federal, University and discipline related regulations and guidelines that relate to these issues.
  2. Be able to distinguish between better and worse choices related to these data management issues and between better and worse justifications for your choices.
  3. Be able to prepare a set of guidelines relevant to the handling of information or data in your own scholarship or research and your area of responsibility.    

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University Policies and Procedures

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Curriculum Overview

Principles

  • Acquisition, processing, and communication of research data are the basis for scientific research, and responsible data management must be an integral part of it.
  • Research data are generated for the benefit of individuals, the University, specific sponsors, or society as a whole. Data management has to consider who derives benefit from the data.
  • The principal investigator of a research project has the ultimate responsibility for the stewardship, oversight, and integrity of the data collection and management of the project, as a key component of the responsible conduct of research.
  • In many cases, intellectual property is based on research data, and data management needs to be tied to the University's Intellectual Property Policy.

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Definitions

Research data are recorded material or recorded information used in systematic inquiry which can be interpreted or from which conclusions may be drawn. Specific fields of scholarship and research may have their own definitions.

Data can be classified as raw, processed, or published.

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Topics for Discussion

  1. Integrity of data acquisition and analysis, e.g. accuracy and reliability, recording of data, data coding and reduction
  2. Control of access to data, including,
    1. protection from unauthorized access or release;
    2. dealing with proprietary information, privacy protection, and open records laws
  3. Data stewardship and use, including
    1. ownership – see intellectual property topic
    2. multi-investigator generated data
    3. rights to copies of data
    4. publication restrictions imposed by funding source, University (for potential patents), community partners, or society
  4. Retention and storage, including,
    1. physical security,
    2. selection of retention time, and
    3. access to archived data.

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Information Resources

Web Sites:

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References:

Christians, C. “Ethics and Politics in Qualitative Research” in Denzin and Lincoln, Handbook of Qualitative Research, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2000.

Creswell, J. Research Design: Qualitative, quantitative and Mixed Methods Approaches.

Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2003.

Fields, K.L., and A.R. Price. "Problems in Research Integrity Arising from Misconceptions About the Ownership of Research," Academic Medicine. 68/9, S60-S64, 1993.

Guidelines for the Conduct of Research at the National Institutes of Health. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, 1990.

"Institute of Medicine, Division of Health Sciences Policy," The Responsible Conduct of Research in the Health Sciences. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1989.

"Policy on Research Data Access and Retention," University of Kentucky, 10/30/1998.

Rennie, D. "Thyroid Storm" (Editorial), JAMA. Vol. 277(15) (April 16, 1997) pp. 1238-1243.

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